The Halls

Period paintings, frescoes and furniture are kept intact in the castle rooms

THE FIREPLACE ROOM
This room is dominated by the very tall trefoil chimney breast built to the typical 15th-century Gothic model, in marked contrast to the frieze and small sculptured pilasters in Renaissance style.
Entirely frescoed by G.B. Zelotti (Verona,1526-Mantua, 1578) and G.A. Fasolo (Mondello, 1530-Vicenza, 1572), a long frieze of garlands, putti, fruit, ox skulls and bunches of grapes decorates the four walls, where four scenes of Roman history narrated by Livy unfold in a broad architectural perspective. The significance of this cycle of frescoes is not entirely clear but in the light of new critical contributions - which date the cycle to around 1570 - it is thought that Giovanni Porto, heir to his uncle Francesco, Generale of the Republic of Venice, wanted to illustrate the contrast between loyalty and betrayal to celebrate the dedication of the Porto family to Venice - also indicated by the ‘Venetian’ architecture of the villa - with a clear allusion to the ambiguous relations of Vicenza,  traditionally tied to the imperial party.
The following episodes are painted in a loggia with Corinthian columns: The Banquet of Cleopatra, the Clemency of Scipio and The Meeting of Massinissa and Sophonisba.

 

THE BILLIARD ROOM
The billiard table and chandelier are from the late 19th century. The display cases contain earthenware statuettes from the end of the 19th century with scenes from the Promessi Sposi (The Betrothed), objects like ivory chips and hand-painted playing and bingo cards.
The display of the important collection of portraits of the members of the Porto, Colleoni and Thiene families begins here, covering four centuries of history, thus also allowing the developments of fashion over the centuries to be reconstructed.

 

BLUE LOUNGE and RED ROOM
Two rooms entirely lined - floor and walls - by Guardino Colleoni in late 19th-century style, retain their period furniture and an important collection of portraits intact.

 

THE HORSE GALLERY
The big hall on the piano nobile repeats the T shaped space of the ground floor. It was originally the granary, which was moved to the top floor after the 16th-century raising of the building. Dominated by the big five-light window, it has a floor with big terracotta squares that was found last century under a layer of 19th-century bitumen. There is a very interesting collection of 17th-century furniture including sofas and various armchairs, all in walnut. A fascinating collection of equestrian portraits hangs on the walls: four paintings of different breeds of horse with riders painted in the 17th century and four paintings with horse and groom, attributed by F. Rigon to Francesco Balante (Thiene, c. 1663-1729), pupil of Pietro Liberi.
The equestrian portrait in the 17th century is closely linked to the contemporary art of equitation, an advanced level of training that was cultivated in the academies. Formal refinement was the distinctive element of the gentleman portrayed in the act of making a precise movement that shows his skill at command and the nature and firmness of his training.
 

 

The Banquet of Cleopatra

The Banquet of Cleopatra

The billiard room

The billiard room

A portait

A portait

Red room

Red room

An equestrian portraits

An equestrian portraits

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